Menu
← back to news

Year one and two inspiration reels

We took some time to reflect back on years past to remember the impact the festival has had in Raleigh and how members of the broader community have lived out the ideas shared there. Here are some of our favorite themes, memories, and stories about who came together, what happened, and the ideas & learnings that inspired us.

Make time for personal creative work

To kick off the first year, keynote speaker Elle Luna encouraged all of us to choose must over should. To follow our “our instincts, our cravings and longings, the things and places and ideas we burn for, the intuition that swells up from somewhere deep inside of us.” If you haven’t picked up a copy of her book yet, it’s pure inspiration to design your best life.

In 2015, Wordless News illustrator, Maria Fabrizio, and New York Times bestselling author / artist, Austin Kleon talked about how they intentionally set aside time each day to create. In the mornings, even if for just 15 minutes, carving the time to create each day can add up to a huge body of work, or inspire a big shift in your life.

“Hopscotch helped reignite the creative spark in me that made me want to build and create things and solve problems in a more creative way. While I’d love to be as artistically creative and inspiring as the Hopscotch speakers, I decided to go the route of trying out programming. After Hopscotch, I attended a one day Django programming workshop and loved it so much I decided to take the full leap towards becoming a developer and enrolled at The Iron Yard. I just finished a 12-week Ruby on Rails program and am getting ready to start my first job as a developer next week!”

We can reinvision the future of cities

Imagine a future where vehicles are made out of soft biomaterials, so when they collide, it’s a gentle bounce, rather than a disastrous, deadly crash? Or a public transportation system that glides through the streets by a wire, traveling at a speed slow enough for people to jump on and off when they need? Or a house that’s made of a tree that’s also edible? Mitchell Joachim, of Tereform ONE, talked to us about pushing the boundaries of architecture and challenged us to imagine future cities that merge with nature.

Interactive art installations during last year’s festival kept the inspiration flowing.

Our City, a nonprofit organization that empowers residents to imagine and build the future of their communities, collaborated with local designers to create three public art projects throughout downtown Raleigh: a transformable pavilion, a composting vertical garden, and moveable, lightweight benches.

The Tactile Workshop’s Transformable Pavilion was designed to address the need of fluidity in our lives. “Each person who visits the pavilion can create their own form depending on how they move the parts in relation to each other. Its potential is to show individuals how our built environment can be more dynamic, and how they themselves have the capacity to choose the possibilities.” – Photo by Chesley Kalnen

Jed Gant created a series of benches that served as a “collective urban porch” to bring an element of serendipity to the festival.

Ink Wars was another interactive art installation that drew a lot of energy during the festival. It was an hour-long drawing competition where artists illustrated a mystery theme that is only revealed when the competition begins. The theme of Hopscotch 2015’s Ink Wars was “The Future of Transportation.”

Photo by New Media Campaigns

Go analog for a while | The-tug-of-war between analog and digital

During his keynote address in 2015, Austin Kleon encouraged us to incorporate an “analog desk” into our workflow. He explained that while digital tools are a great resource throughout a project, they can also stifle creativity.

“Don’t start with the computer—end with the computer. There are too many opportunities to hit the delete key [when you’re working digitally].”
-Austin Kleon

Steve Frykholm and Christopher Simmons also talked about how stepping away from the screen can foster new connections and serendipitous collisions that feed creativity.

Thanks to Frykholm’s quote, “If I start doing something with my hands all the young designers gather around. They wonder what the hell I’m doing.” and Austin Kleon’s well-supplied desk and very cool hands-on projects, I left motivated to work more in the analog world. I have let go of some of my need to make things “perfect” before sharing them, focusing more on the process for my current #the100dayproject. It is still a goal to create more tangible work, and it will happen, eventually.
-2015 Festival Attendee

“I was inspired by the idea that inspiration surrounds us. I’ve always felt that I wasn’t very creative or inspired, but the idea that even if you’re just copying someone’s idea for practice will help you get your head in a more creative space resonated with me. Since Hopscotch, I went to code school, and I learned that even following a prompt or clear set of development requirements inspired me to expand and elaborate upon the idea — rather than just doing exactly what was asked.”
-2015 Festival Attendee

Make friends, collaborate, and you never know what will happen

San Francisco-based photographer, Helena Price, spoke about the importance of creating lasting, meaningful relationships while networking, instead of approaching people as a mere connection. Without deep connections, Helena said she wouldn’t have been able to quit her job at a startup to pursue a full-time career in photography.

Adam Cutler, Design Studio Program Director at IBM, talked to us about how IBM has designed new spaces, workflows, and strategies to boost collaboration within teams and across the organization.

In 2014 Brian Singer shared the story of how his 1000 journals project became a hugely successful collaborative experiment promoting shared creativity among strangers.

“I do think that attending the festival and seeing what inspired the various designers to do the work that they do resonated deeply with me. Both years I attended the festival, I left with a lot of energy and optimism…I think this year I did a much better job harnessing that energy and turning it into something great; not only a new skill, but a different career path!” -2015 Festival Attendee

Design at the White House

Ashleigh Axios, Creative Director at the White House, spoke about how the White House embraces creative methods of communication. We got a sneak peak behind the White House’s design standards, and heard a few stories about the Obamas IRL (which are top secret, of course!)

The Making of a Hit Song

Graham Roberts, senior graphics editor at The New York Times, took his audience behind the scenes of the making of the Justin Bieber, Skrillex, Diplo hit, “Where Are Ü Now?” In his New York Times piece “Bieber, Diplo and Skrillex Make a Hit,” Graham explores the sounds, production, and thought process behind the song through a visual approach.

“I was inspired by the idea that inspiration surrounds us. I’ve always felt that I wasn’t very creative or inspired, but the idea that even if you’re just copying someone’s idea for practice will help you get your head in a more creative space resonated with me. Since Hopscotch, I went to code school, and I learned that even following a prompt or clear set of development requirements inspired me to expand and elaborate upon the idea — rather than just doing exactly what was asked.”
-2015 Festival Attendee

To shape the 2016 festival we’re building off an incredible platform of community and inspiration. We hope you’ll be part of it!

Buy Tickets Back to News

In Other News

Don't miss the adventure. Subscribe to our mailing list.

A year’s worth of inspiration in one delicious, social nugget.
- 2016 Hopscotcher

Sept 7-8, 2017 | Raleigh, NC

We're pushing our own edges and using some new technologies to power this site. It may require you to update your browser.

If you're using an outdated browser, or Microsoft Edge, you may have a lesser experience.

Close